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I've been thinking about alliance-building lately, and what role our… - AP Racism

Jun. 14th, 2006

12:37 pm

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I've been thinking about alliance-building lately, and what role our allies should play in our various respective struggles, and what roles I can play as an ally. As a non-white person, I want my white allies to educate white people on white supremacy, as a woman I want men to educate other men on male supremacy, and as a Palestinian I want my Jewish allies to talk to other Jewish people about the occupation of Palestine. I want these things because it is too exhausting for me to deal with anymore, because these groups aren't likely to listen to me in the same way they would listen to people within their group, and because a lot of the dialog people from those groups want to engage me in is manipulative and abusive, and mostly serves to reaffirm their own belief that they are good people and that I am overreacting. I think a huge thing that allies can do for us is just making themselves known, and letting other people in their group know what they stand for. That being said, I think that when people talk about being allies, there is a lot of problematic stuff that can come up from that, and often it just seems like a pat on the back for themselves, without any real action taken to further the cause of the people they are supposed to share an alliance with.

cut for length.

This weekend I went to the AMWAJ (Arab Movement of Women Arising for Justice) conference (was anyone else here there?), and attended a workshop on Building Alliances with African American Communities. I ended up being pretty disappointed with the workshop, but I am still working out the specific reasons for my disappointment. I was hoping to hear other's stories of community building and what worked/what didn't, etc. Most of the workshop consisted of speaking of the privilege that non-black people have, the pervasive effects of slavery, and the need for reparations. These are important things that a large part of our community has yet to recognize, I guess I was just hoping that it would be taken further. One thing that irritated me was the lack of inclusion of Black Arabs in the discussion, serving to further marginalize them and exclude them from the Arab community. I guess I don't see much hope for alliance building with African Americans when people who ARE Arab AND Black are left out of the equation from jump.

There are a lot of community groups out there that exist to help Arabs and new immigrants, and I would like to hear how they approached alliance building, and teaching people about slavery, public policy, media representations, etc. Like I mentioned above, I think it is important for Arabs (specifically light skinned Arabs), if we want to be allies, to educate other Arabs on white supremacy, the subjugation of black people, and where we fit into the equation, especially as newly immigrated people who are often the victims of racial profiling, hate crimes, prejudice, discrimination, etc.

This whole discussion also reminded me of a time in my Arabic 1 class several years ago, in which a woman asked the teacher how to say, "I am a Black woman," and the teacher responded that there was no equivilant word in Arabic, there were only words for "dark-skinned," and that Arabic-speaking people didn't distinguish between people in that way. The explanation she gave made it sound as if Arabic is a perfectly anti-racist language, but it's not true. The only Arabic word I know that means "Black" (as in "Black woman") is a racial slur that is pretty widely used among non-Black Arabs. And there is not an Arab woman around that will tell you that the lighter your skin, the better (unless she has very pale skin and the preferencial treatment is just normal to her). There's this whole denial of racism/colorism from a whole lot of Arabs, as if it will go away if we don't talk about it.

I guess I just want to hear any thoughts on this, any reflections from attempts at alliance building, etc. I would also like to pose the question to Black people here: what do you personally need from your Arab allies?

Comments:

From:azad_slide
Date:June 14th, 2006 06:30 pm (UTC)
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Ok this is the thing, sometimes I feel sorry about this because I feel like I am being a racist and hateful bitch.

I don’t like most white people.. not just white Americans.. but MOST white people. I just think that their culture (or lack of culture) is just so fucking cold and mean. I call it the “meme selfish culture” that’s willing to run over anyone so that they can “express themselves” I don’t like them and have a hard time working/organizing with any of them. Is that closed minded of me? Maybe, but the only white folks who belong to organizations that I have ever got along with are the folks who organize the CWS workshops. http://www.cwsworkshop.org/ and even they can come off as being somewhat pretensions at times.

I don't know any other white activists or groups of white people that I actually respect.

The only organizations that I have ever felt comfortable in are other middle eastern groups.. or various other groups that are composed of a majority of people of color. I feel more at ease around them, I can speak normal, I can relax, I can talk about my family without them acting like it’s weird that I am talking about my family, I can talk about immigration issues, and I can feel SAFE and don’t have to worry that the people I am around are going to go out and do something that’s going to get me arrested or deported.

"As a non-white person, I want my white allies to educate white people on white supremacy, as a woman I want men to educate other men on male supremacy, and as a Palestinian I want my Jewish allies to talk to other Jewish people about the occupation of Palestine. I want these things because it is too exhausting for me to deal with anymore, because these groups aren't likely to listen to me in the same way they would listen to people within their group"

YES! EXACTLY!

a few years ago i came to the same conclusion and made the decision that I would not become friends with or work/organize with any white folks who are not actively challenging racism, their own privilege, and white supremacy.

and I don't care if they are just against racism. that only makes them a non-racist. if they are not ACTIVELY challenging and taking a stand against white supremacy I really don't want anything to do with them.

the one thing that I find the most annoying about white activists is "activist" speak - I don't get it, don't want anything to do with it and i find it to be so fucking offensive and alienating.

I kind of talked about this in my own LJ - in a post right over here

http://azad-slide.livejournal.com/451382.html
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From:nobetternoworse
Date:June 15th, 2006 02:35 pm (UTC)
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i agree with you about activist speak, to an extent. i think the girl you mentioned in your post (or maybe it was in the comments, i can't remember) was way out of line, but it's important not to discount the actual queer and transgendered people of color in our communities. i think that education should come from within, though, because otherwise it reaffirms it as a "white people's problem," and her approach really does nothing to educate the community, it only serves to make her feel righteous.
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From:azad_slide
Date:June 15th, 2006 03:47 pm (UTC)
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well of course it's important not to discount them.. but when you have white folks working with a group of farmworkers, and she or he is telling me all this stuff it's just weird and wrong.

yeah i agree with the rest of what you said.
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From:azad_slide
Date:June 14th, 2006 06:39 pm (UTC)

back to your post

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One thing that irritated me was the lack of inclusion of Black Arabs in the discussion, serving to further marginalize them and exclude them from the Arab community... to educate other Arabs on white supremacy, the subjugation of black people, and where we fit into the equation, especially as newly immigrated people who are often the victims of racial profiling, hate crimes, prejudice, discrimination, etc.

yup, I see that in the Iranian community too. People from the south (who have darker skin) are treated like shit. There was a Persian movie about it a few years ago.. and I find that offensive. I also think it's odd when middle eastern people end up talking shit about black people and Hispanic people.

the way that i have always approached it is by saying that "yes we have these things that are hurting our community, yes we are being marginalized, yes we are targeted, etc. etc" BUT that does not mean that we're perfect, and that does not mean that there are all types of fucked up power dynamic issues within our own communities. I have never liked it when people make "us" the victims and act like our cultures are perfect and above being criticized. The critique just has to come from the inside. Iranian Noble Peace Price winner Shirin Ehbadi speaks about this issue a lot in her book. She criticizes the west AND the Iranian community for their various oppressive actions against the women, and political dissidents in Iran. I don’t know what to call it in English.. but sometimes I feel like activists romanticizes other cultures and make them out to be all perfect and harmonious.. that’s wrong, and it further alienates the people who are struggling for equality and change in those cultures.
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From:nobetternoworse
Date:June 15th, 2006 02:38 pm (UTC)

Re: back to your post

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but sometimes I feel like activists romanticizes other cultures and make them out to be all perfect and harmonious.. that’s wrong, and it further alienates the people who are struggling for equality and change in those cultures.

and it doesn't just alienate the activists within those cultures, it negatively affects the non-activists within the culture as well.
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From:azad_slide
Date:June 15th, 2006 03:45 pm (UTC)

Re: back to your post

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yup
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From:nobetternoworse
Date:June 14th, 2006 06:46 pm (UTC)
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And there is not an Arab woman around that will tell you that the lighter your skin, the better (unless she has very pale skin and the preferencial treatment is just normal to her).

woops, this should have read like this: And there is not an Arab woman around that will tell you that she's unfamiliar with the idea that the lighter your skin, the better (unless she has very pale skin and the preferencial treatment is just normal to her).
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From:witchsistah
Date:June 14th, 2006 09:21 pm (UTC)
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want these things because it is too exhausting for me to deal with anymore, because these groups aren't likely to listen to me in the same way they would listen to people within their group, and because a lot of the dialog people from those groups want to engage me in is manipulative and abusive, and mostly serves to reaffirm their own belief that they are good people and that I am overreacting.

AMEN! And that's why I got out of the free "Educate Whitey" biz! I became bitter, exhausted and plain' ol' BURNT OUT! Now, I'm just about living MY life and going whereverthefuck I please no matter who likes it or not because I'm also sick and fuckin' tired of always having to consider Whites' feelings on matters of my frikken life that 1) is none of their fuckin' business and 2) it's not like they think one blip about MY Black ass as they tool along in their lives!

/rant
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From:nobetternoworse
Date:June 15th, 2006 02:39 pm (UTC)
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right on.
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From:mila_manosevic
Date:June 14th, 2006 11:17 pm (UTC)
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Well, if it were me, I'd want to talk not only about the privilege of non-black people, but the fact that when immigrants come over they tend to identify more with white people. This is because white people control the media, they control the messages that are put out about black and latino people. It's because a white media paints themselves as the paragon of virtues, so that even in Americans are all individualists jerkasses, at least the white ones values are "closer" as opposed to the non-values of blacks and hispanics.

They use middle men ethnicities as their jumping post, and really if you could separate yourself from lazy shiftless do-gooders would you or wouldn't you? It's kind of in the way before, when I was talking about whiteness becoming the catchall for everything is good. Suddenly, reading is white, eating healthily is white, having a job is white.. these are things that all of know are not constructs of whiteness, but they get relegated to white people and render whiteness neutral or better. I wouldn't expect people not to pick up on that, even the "native" born citizens of this country follow it.

I think you were upset because it was disengious and it was. First, if we'd ever want to make something like this happen.. we'd have to do it being honest on both sides. The fact that many black people feel threatened in their communities by Arab store owners and non-black owned businesses (especially in poorer communities) creates conflict. The hidden injustices of black Arabs and of the religion of a people who still practice slavery (not all muslims obviously are arab, but you know the deal), is also one of those. You have to be honest in recognizing it's not just about who is the victim, because black people really don't need pity. We need understanding and we need political and monetary power. Something that people who immigrate to this country will occasionally have because more likely than not. It is almost like we are getting all these mixed messages from people about ourselves and then we believe them about the others because we don't have a firsthand experience with them. Or perhaps we do have a firsthand experience which then cements just how "untrustworthy" we are.

Black people can often be painted as whiners, not willing to work hard enough, people who don't want to succeed. Afterall, look at the other races who come over and do succeed. People discount what having a college education before you come over might do for you? Or coming from a monied family previously in a home country might do for you? Or that simply the circumstances around black empowerment can not at all be acted out like the other models that have worked in Asian and Middle Eastern communities. I think more people need to understand the degrees and shades of discrimination that are practiced. We need to learn each other's customs. We need to learn that you aren't black or white and that you're not just white brown people.

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From:mila_manosevic
Date:June 14th, 2006 11:17 pm (UTC)

continued...

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On our end, I think one of the best things we can do is to start realizing that we don't have a monopoly on oppression and start listening to other communities of color about what is happening. About how they are treated and we have to stop ranking that it was "only" this, and that it's not at bad as "what black folks go through", because it rears it's head in many different ways, for many different ethnicities. We need to talk about how there's a place for all of us at the table, and that we don't/shouldn't have to fight. That mentioning other ethnicities/races in no way shuts down the conversation or plays into the oppression olympics, but that we can all recognize it's horrible and in many different ways.

But we're divorced (and aren't even beginning to be educated) from your history, and you only know bits and pieces of ours. This would perhaps be the best way to start, making the effort to pull bits and pieces of our community together through history and then relating that to now. If it were me, I would take the words of arab-american and arab women and talk about the pressures in their culture and the beauty in it. I would take the words of black women who talk about their culture and the beauty and the pressures of it. Then, I'd use that as a jumping. We suffer from colorism, the sort of oppression that black feminists have written about within our communities is well documented, and the perceptions/images of ourselves within the media. We should talk about our identities.
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From:nobetternoworse
Date:June 15th, 2006 03:48 pm (UTC)

Re: continued...

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but the fact that when immigrants come over they tend to identify more with white people.

you are exactly right. in the mixed race/interracial dating workshop i attended at the same conference, one thing that came up over and over was people being told "you're white," and parents who were/are arab calling themselves "white." in addition to the media, i'm sure this also has something to do with being "white" (meaning not black, and not a foreigner) in their home country. of course these immigrants would tend to identify with the people who occupy the same position that they previously occupied.

the issue of arab owned business in black neighborhoods is a huge one for me, because that is generally the main point of contact between both groups in this area (i know it's a regional thing). that scenario enables both groups to see each other in an incredibly negative light: the arab storeowner is likely to be the victim of an economically motivated crime, likely to be called derogatory names, and likely to be extremely judgemental of black people buying alcohol, blunts, and lottery tickets (specifically if the store owner is muslim); the store owner is likely to show contempt for his customers, may use violence against them (there was a case of a north african arab murdering a black man in his store in detroit, and then bouncing back to his home country without standing trial), and the store will basically stand as a beacon in the neighborhood of what the people living there can't have.

i feel that the most neglected aspect of outreach and community building is in the lower income and newly immigrated communities, and i feel that this is where community groups could really do something. the arab american museum participated in an event where children could visit the arab american museum, african american museum, and jewish museum. but there is a huge group of people who don't go to the museum, so what about those people? the workshop did feel disingenous, and i was also frustrated by the elitist nature of it (see accusehistory's comment below, i agree with what she said).

the first paragraph of your second comment is wonderfully put. this is something that has been a big obstacle for me in dialogs outside of my progressive mixed interracial-dating circle of friends. i think personal narratives are important in those dialogs, because no one can argue with one's actual experience (at least not with any credibility). i think there is a fear that, if other people's issues are brought to the table and discussed, they will get resolved and those people will move ahead, while black people's issues will continue to go unresolved.

in addition to what you said about the media, the education kids receive in the u.s. about other cultures (and i mean ALL cultures but WASP) plays into this as well. i know that for me personally, i learned almost nothing about non-white people in school, and what i did learn was either incorrect or completely useless. for a lot of arab kids i have talked to, their public school education reinforces that they are white, because they have nowhere else to fall in.

i think that arab women and black women have a lot in common (specifically in this country), in terms of colorism, men, the roles they are relegated to, sexism in each respective community, so i think that would be a good place to start the dialog: around women. the women would teach the children, etc.
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From:mila_manosevic
Date:June 15th, 2006 09:27 pm (UTC)

Re: continued...

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the issue of arab owned business in black neighborhoods is a huge one for me, because that is generally the main point of contact between both groups in this area (i know it's a regional thing). that scenario enables both groups to see each other in an incredibly negative light: the arab storeowner is likely to be the victim of an economically motivated crime, likely to be called derogatory names, and likely to be extremely judgemental of black people buying alcohol, blunts, and lottery tickets (specifically if the store owner is muslim); the store owner is likely to show contempt for his customers, may use violence against them (there was a case of a north african arab murdering a black man in his store in detroit, and then bouncing back to his home country without standing trial), and the store will basically stand as a beacon in the neighborhood of what the people living there can't have.

Then, when you put something together or talk about it at another workshop, make sure you bring this up. We had two arab owned stores in our neighborhood and I think one of the reasons they were so successful is that they were involved in our community. They actually spoke to us, made jokes, and were friendly. They hired people from our community. They were robbed at least 2 times, but they stayed there. Then they sold the business to black people who had been working there. They even invited people to attend one of the weddings (one of the owners married a black lady from the projects and eventually had children with her).
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From:accusehistory
Date:June 15th, 2006 05:35 am (UTC)
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I've heard the term Aswad (for everyone, that is a literal translation of the word "Black"), in Arabic, to refer to Black people (in general, not Black Arabs in particular)...this might be due to the influence of "American" terminology as it's a straight up translation, and I don't know how often it's used. But my parents use it...I also have to say this is largely a cultural difference, because in talking with various people, "Black" as an identity is rare in the Arab world - so it makes sense that skin colour is talked about, rather than racialized identities.

This of course does not take away from problems of colourism/racism in Arab communities, nor does it negate the fact that some people (though this is definitely changing) use the word "slave" as a word to describe Black people.

99.9% of Arabs are not part of the elite, but the elite in many countries are the ones who project this image of lightness (except in the Gulf where dark skin is much more common) - I feel like a lot of people in North America have no idea what Arabs actually look like, or understand that we all don't look the same. Hell, a lot of Arabs (depending on the region they live in/where they grew up) don't know a lot of this stuff - and don't know that a lot of Black Arabs are the direct descendants of ancient Arab tribes. Colonialism and our own misdeeds (as Arabs) have really fucked us up.

I feel really disconnected from mainstream Arab-American stuff - I'm not wealthy, hell, I didn't even grow up middle-class, and I feel like a lot of Arab-American organizing comes from a economically privileged group of people. I don't know if my perception is right...what do you think? I really think this plays into the types of activism that is occuring.

And to also come at it from a Canadian point of view, I think waves of immigration in Canada by Arabs have really different, so Arabs occupy a different social position...at least this is my experience, growing up in a low-income area where a lot of Arabs are/were on social assistance and are facing many barriers...there's a real push in social work right now to get more Somali and Arab people in the field because these communities have been identified as in need of greater resources.

Sorry if I went off topic here, but it's how I identify why some of the more assimiliationist/"established" sectors of Arab-American stuff doesn't appeal to me...I feel like before Sept. 11th, Arab-Americans (not everyone, as there's always been racially conscious Arabs making links, especially as a colonized peoples) were content to vote Republican and try to blend in with the mainstream, and why is it now that links need to be made? I don't think this is unique to Arab-Americans, but damn...I still feel like some Christian Arabs are just worried that they're associated with Muslims now.

I missed AMWAJ so it was cool to hear your perspective on one of the workshops.
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From:accusehistory
Date:June 15th, 2006 05:46 am (UTC)
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and don't know that a lot of Black Arabs are the direct descendants of ancient Arab tribes.

Okay, I should clarify what I mean by this, I mean that a lot of Arabs in Yemen and Saudi Arabia have African ancestry (and yeah, a lot of it because the fucked up Arab slave trade), but also ancient Arab ancestry as well and are closer to ancient Arabs than me as a Palestinian.
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From:nobetternoworse
Date:June 15th, 2006 06:34 pm (UTC)
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i haven't heard that word used (but my arabic's not that good, so i might have just missed it), but the word that i have heard used is "abed." is that the word that means slave? i knew that people used it to describe black people, but like i said, my arabic is bad so i didn't know the literal translation.

i feel pretty much exactly the same as you regarding mainstream arab-american stuff. it doesn't have any special relevance to me for a few reason. i also don't feel disconnected from the community at large because my mom is white and i am SO americanized & non-traditional, and a lot of arab people don't consider me a "real" arab. actually, amwaj was the first time in years that i really felt like there was a place for me in the arab community. it was a lot different than other conferences and organizing experiences i have had, more of the women of color & identity politics type of thing. but i think that a lot of the organizing going on in general is by people who are more concerned with reaching assimilation and being accepted into mainstream politics/media/etc. than lifting up their people and promoting equality for others as well. i think people get caught up in academia and don't realize (don't care?) that they aren't reaching the vast majority of arab americans/canadians. i want to make sure to say, though, that there are a lot of people doing very important things for the community and i don't want to discount that.

i'd really be interested in learning more about canadian arabs. when i was little i went to montreal to visit cousins, and i noticed that they lived in the projects with a whole lot of other brown people--while we, in texas, lived in a single family home around a whole lot of white people. the resources our two families started off with were pretty much the same, so i think that says a lot about social position (although i am not sure whether or not the father of that household went to college, and my father did).

i agree with you about september 11th. i'm glad that more arabs became politicized and were forced to realize that, no, white people don't see us as white, but at the same time it does seem self-serving. like all the injustices that other people of color have endured didn't matter until they started happening to arabs, and so once arabs have gone through legal battles, won certain court cases, gotten a positive arab character on tv, assimilated enough, or whatever, then they will forget about the links they have made and the other struggles that need to be helped and taken care of. i really hate it when arab people say things about arab people being basically white before september 11th because, 1) it's not true (iran missile crisis? yes, that was iran, not an arab country, but it's not as if americans have ever been able to tell arabs and persians apart) and 2) so know that you're not white anymore you're going to finally do the right thing, or some version of it?

if you have any more questions about amwaj let me know! i'd be happy to tell you about it: no.snow.here (at) gmail dot com

and you should check these out:
1) arab & persian american FEMALE hiphop:
http://www.myspace.com/mamazhouse
myspace.com/mspersia; myspace.com/aimathedreamer
2) queer arab hiphop:
http://www.myspace.com/hotnar

one person from each group performed at amwaj. it is so nice to find political arab american hip hop that is actually ill...but these recordings don't really do justice to the live performance unfortunately.
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From:accusehistory
Date:June 15th, 2006 08:49 pm (UTC)
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Yeah, that's the word - Abed is a translation of slave. That's why you see so many Muslim/Arabic names with the "Abd" in them, in that sense it would be something like "Abdallah" - to signifiy that one is a servant of God...

I find it so sad that people would sit around and try and decide who a real Arab is - considering so many of us are acculturated Arabs who were "Arabized" wither through Arab conquest or trade...I mean, Palestinians are only Arab in language/culture and partial ancestry anyway...

I don't know how to account for the Canadian situation, the situation of Arab immigrants seems so varied - from the really powerful Syrian community in Haiti, to the intense poverty and discrimination towards North Africans in France...anything I say about this would be speculation, but I think Christians account for among the most influential/earliest portion of Arab immigrants in the United States than in Canada which may account for assimilation trends (not that all Arab Christians are easily assimilated or early immigrants - there's so many other factors, I was just trying to tease out some), a lot of Arabs in Canada are refugees from Lebanon and therefore, may have arrived poorer than economic immigrants...

Hmmm, there is also plenty of Arabs in Canada who are middle-to-upper class and live in those areas, but Arabs overall, I think, run the whole economic spectrum here and have never been considered white in this country (to my knowledge).

I also want to say, because the Black population in Canada is much smaller than the U.S. Black population (and most Blacks in Canada are immigrants, although there are desecendants of North American slaves here too) there isn't that Black/White binary. I think this really affects the experience of POC in this country - racism (apart from the disgusting and violent racism aimed at Aboriginal communities) often manifests itself, in Canada, into hostility towards "immigrants" (used primarily to mean immigrants of colour, and to some people including non-immigrant people of colour!!)
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From:rosie_posie_860
Date:June 16th, 2006 08:52 pm (UTC)
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You go to Wayne State (I do too). I am glad because I won't have to spend too much time explaining what I am about to say.

In Metro Detroit, there is a Latino v. Arab v. Black mentality. I find myself caught in the middle every time. As a Black Latino who studied Arabic and is considering Islam, I am in the middle. I have to constantly explain to non-Arabs that what you see on TV is not a good representation of Arabs. A lot of non-Arabs believe that living in Metro Detroit makes them experts of what Arabs think/do. A lot of criticism I hear them make of Arab culture are problems that plague their own and many other communities (I have a Mexican friend who complained that Arab men are abusive, misogynistic, etc. when the same problem is also found in the Latino community (and several others).

I've also experienced racism from Arabs. And again, it is based entirely on stereotypes. There is always the distrust of Blacks that go into Arab-owned stores. I've also seen Arab men who fetishize (sp?) Black women. They are willing to date Black women but hate Black men. I've heard Arabs and Chaldeans who buy into stereotypes about Blacks/Hispanics.

I think we need to first address these stereotypes. These stereotypes are coming from White America, and none of these groups are aware of that or willing to admit it. What I would like in an Arab ally is exactly waht you said you wanted in an ally: someone who is willing to educate others, but I don't just want someone who educates Arabs about non-Arabs. I want Arabs who are willing to step out of their community and interact with others, especially Arab men. I find that these stereotypes will continue if Latino, Blacks and Arabs continue to seperate themselves.


Off-topic, but I find there are a lot of similarities between the Hispanic and Arab communities. There is a lot of denial (or maybe it's ignorance) of Blacks in both communities. As an Afro-Cuban, I am not always recognized as a Latino. There is also light-skin privilege in Hispanic cultures. There are many more similarities, but I'm tired of typing.

Oh, I also find that social class and country of origin plays a difference too. I notice that many darker-skinned Arabs treat Blacks and Latinos differently than lighter-skinned Arabs, but I don't want to make a sweeping generalization. There are many things that play many different roles. Religion seperates also. Like accusehistory said, many Christian Arabs are afraid of being associated with Muslim Arabs. Chaldeans want nothing to do with the Arab community at all (I know they are not Arab, but there's a stigma attached to being Arab). IMO, these are all problems because the more divisions we make, the harder it is to fight racism. There are too many minorities and ethnic groups who want to side with the dominant White culture. That scares me because the DWC is wishy-washy. It may accept you one minute and isolate you the next.

Really off-topic now, but this sort of reminds me of a man on a local radio station. He always has something negative to say about the Arab/Muslim communities, but he's married to a Lebanese woman. I'm guessing she considers herself White, but when he revealed that she was Lebanese, he was talking about airport security, and how his wife is self-conscious because she's Lebanese. On top of that, he complains when Arabs complain about being singled out after 9/11. I'm confused.
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From:rosie_posie_860
Date:June 16th, 2006 08:54 pm (UTC)
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To clarify, I mean that Latinos and Blacks should interact with each other and the Arab community as well.

I also hope nothing I said sounds like sweeping generalizations. I am poor at expressing myself on the Internet.
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